Can Technology Finally Deliver on India’s Legal Aid Promise?

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Title of the article, blog entry, editorial, essay, graphic, interview, or other content Can Technology Finally Deliver on India’s Legal Aid Promise?
Author Siddharth Peter de Souza, Varsha Aithala
Editor
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If the content appeared in a periodical, newsletter, journal, or similar publication, insert the name of the publication here
If the content appeared on a website or blog, insert the name of the website or blog here Stanford Social Innovation Review
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First page
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Date July 27, 2018
Year of publication or release 2018 CE
URL https://ssir.org/articles/entry/can technology finally deliver on indias legal aid promise?utm source=Enews&utm medium=Email&utm campaign=SSIR Now&utm content=Read More
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Quotation from the resource [I]f the Indian government is serious about reforming the legal aid apparatus, it will need buy-in on new technologies from all stakeholders: legal services authorities, lawyers, judges, and litigants, who are the critical constituency. To thrive, any platform aiming to ease the administrative burdens of the judiciary needs a close-knit community of active users (state and non-state) and must be able to handle high user volumes. Most importantly, these projects must address litigants’ potential lack of trust in technology due to unfamiliarity, privacy concerns, and fear of misuse.
For a resource in print, insert the citation for the quotation here
For a resource online, insert the citation for the quotation here Siddharth Peter de Souza and Varsha Aithala, "Can Technology Finally Deliver on India’s Legal Aid Promise?" Stanford Social Innovation Review, July 27, 2018, accessed August 26, 2018, https://goo.gl/t9JHUW
Relevant century CE or BCE 21 CE
Relevant years CE or BCE
Relevant geographic areas India
Relevant languages
Relevant terms and phrases legal aid, pro bono, reform, apparatus, buy in, technology, stakeholder, legal, service, legal service, authority, lawyer, judge, litigant, constituency, platform, administrative, burden, judiciary, close-knit, community, active, user, state, non-, volume, trust, lack, unfamiliarity, privacy, fear, misuse
Relevant individuals
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Relevant books
Relevant websites and blogs Docassemble, LawRato, MyAdvo, Stanford Social Innovation Review
Relevant articles, blog entries, editorials, essays, graphics, interviews, and other content
Relevant periodicals, newsletters, journals, and similar publications
Relevant databases and repositories
Relevant applications DoNotPay, Clio, Rechtwijzer
Relevant PDF documents
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Relevant audio and podcasts
Relevant projects and activities E-Courts, Nyaya Mitra, Pro bono Legal Services, Tele Law
Relevant events
Relevant constitutions, treaties, conventions, statutes, legislation, judicial decisions, regulations, proclamations, or other sources or enactments of law Article 39A of the Constitution of India

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Siddharth Peter de Souza +  and Varsha Aithala +
DoNotPay +, Clio +  and Rechtwijzer +
E-Courts +, Nyaya Mitra +, Pro bono Legal Services +  and Tele Law +
legal aid +, pro bono +, reform +, apparatus +, buy in +, technology +, stakeholder +, legal +, service +, legal service +, authority +, lawyer +, judge +, litigant +, constituency +, platform +, administrative +, burden +, judiciary +, close-knit +, community +, active +, user +, state +, non- +, volume +, trust +, lack +, unfamiliarity +, privacy +, fear +  and misuse +
Docassemble +, LawRato +, MyAdvo +  and Stanford Social Innovation Review +
July 27, 2018 +
[I]f the Indian government is serious abou[I]f the Indian government is serious about reforming the legal aid apparatus, it will need buy-in on new technologies from all stakeholders: legal services authorities, lawyers, judges, and litigants, who are the critical constituency. To thrive, any platform aiming to ease the administrative burdens of the judiciary needs a close-knit community of active users (state and non-state) and must be able to handle high user volumes. Most importantly, these projects must address litigants’ potential lack of trust in technology due to unfamiliarity, privacy concerns, and fear of misuse.ity, privacy concerns, and fear of misuse. +
Siddharth Peter de Souza and Varsha Aithala, "Can Technology Finally Deliver on India’s Legal Aid Promise?" Stanford Social Innovation Review, July 27, 2018, accessed August 26, 2018, https://goo.gl/t9JHUW +
Can Technology Finally Deliver on India’s Legal Aid Promise? +
Stanford Social Innovation Review +